25 Signs Adulting Isn’t For You

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  1. You only clean your apartment when guests come over
  2. By “clean” you mean “shove everything under the bed”
  3. You’ve accidentally used body wash instead of shampoo
  4. You’ve purposely used body wash instead of shampoo, because you ran out of shampoo
  5. Your kitchen sink is full of dishes, even though you haven’t cooked in days
  6. You’ve eaten cereal for dinner
  7. You’ve worn a bathing suit instead of underwear
  8. You tell yourself you reuse towels to save water, but it’s really to avoid doing laundry
  9. Leggings ARE pants
  10. You try to eat fruits and vegetables every day
  11. By “fruits and veggies” you usually mean “fruit-flavored gummies and veggie straws”
  12. You have “the chair” where you keep clothes that are too clean for the hamper, but too dirty for the closet
  13. You have a designated place for shoes, but they somehow end up in your living room floor
  14. You wash dishes…when you run out of clean forks
  15. Your pet has been to the vet more recently than you’ve been to the doctor
  16. You do laundry when you run out of clean underwear
  17. You’ve turned your underwear inside out and worn them again to avoid doing laundry
  18. After you finally do laundry, the clean clothes sit in a pile that you sift through for a week instead of folding and putting away
  19. A cascade of crumbs falls off your lap when you stand up after eating
  20. You also discover a collection of crumbs in your bra, which you eat
  21. You don’t say no to free food, even if you aren’t hungry, because it’s FREE
  22. You don’t say no to free alcohol BECAUSE IT’S FREE
  23. You realize you put your shirt on inside out–halfway through your day
  24. You get distracted while shaving and can’t remember if you shaved both legs or just one
  25. You sacrifice sleep for Netflix

Did you enjoy this post? What are some signs you’re not up for adulting? Share your thoughts in the comments below!

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10 Women in STEM who Made History

  1. Marie Curie
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    One of my personal favorite scientists is Maria Skłodwska Curie, better known as Madame Marie Curie, is one of the most well-known scientists in history. She was born in Warsaw, Poland (which was controlled by Russia at the time), where she began her studies. Dr. Curie went on to become the first female professor at the University of Paris, the first woman to win a Nobel prize, and is the only person (not just the only woman, the only person) to win a Nobel prize in two different science categories. She was a physicist and chemist who pioneered research in radioactivity (she even coined the term “radioactivity”), and paved the way for women like me to become scientists.
  2. Rosalind Franklin
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    Rosalind Franklin
    was a major contributor to our current understanding of the structure of DNA. Using X-rays, Dr. Franklin examined DNA, and her images helped Watson and Crick to discover the double helix structure, a discovery that earned them a Nobel prize (which was unfortunately awarded after Dr. Franklin’s death, and therefore she was not a co-recipient of the award). In addition to her work with DNA, Dr. Franklin also researched virus structure, for which her co-worker, Aaron Klug earned a Nobel prize in chemistry (again, this was after her death, so Dr. Franklin was not a co-recipient).
  3. Flossie Wong-Staal
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    Flossie Wong-Staal, as the image above states, was the first researcher to clone and map the genes of HIV. Her research was instrumental in the discovery that HIV causes AIDS. She also discovered the function of the genes in the virus. Currently, Dr. Wong-Staal is the chief scientific officer for iTherX, a pharmaceutical company she co-founded.
  4. Barbara McClintock
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    Dr. Barbara McClintock’s biggest achievement is the discovery of genetic transposition, for which she earned a Nobel prize in physiology or medicine. She is the only woman to earn an unshared Nobel prize in that category. Dr. McClintock conducted her research on maize, where she studied chromosomes. Her research led to many discoveries in the field of genetics, including crossing over during meiosis, also known as genetic recombination, the roles of various chromosomal segments, and theories on the suppression and expression of genes.
  5. Valentina Tereshkova
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    On June 16th, 1963, Valentina Tereshkova became the first woman to go to space. After being honorarily inducted into the Soviet Air Force, Tereshkova joined the cosmonaut corps, and became the first civilian to travel to space. After her cosmonaut career, she attended the Zhukovsky Air Force Academy where she graduated as a cosmonaut engineer; she later earned a doctorate in engineering. Dr. Tereshkova was a prominent member of the communist party, and remained politically active after the fall of the Soviet Union. She is still well-loved and in 2013 expressed her love of Mars and desire to travel there. Dr. Tereshkova was quoted saying “We know the human limits. And for us this remains a dream. Most likely the first flight will be one way. But I am ready.”
  6. Stephanie Kwolek
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    You may not have heard of Stephanie Kwolek, but I assure you, you know her legacy, Kevlar. While working for DuPont as a chemist, she was tasked with developing a new fiber to be used in tires. The mixture she created was almost thrown away, but Kwolek convinced a co-worker it should be tested, and it was found to be incredibly strong, especially considering its weight. This fiber was perfected into what we know as Kevlar, the material bulletproof vests are made from. Her discoveries also led to the rise of the polymer science.
  7. Shirley Ann Jackson
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    In 1973, Shirley Ann Jackson became the first African-American woman to earn a PhD from MIT, and the second African-American woman to earn a doctorate in Physics. Dr. Jackson spent her scientific career as a theoretical physicist, an overwhelmingly male-dominated field. She has contributed to over 100 scientific articles. In 1995, Dr. Jackson was appointed to serve as the chairman of the Nuclear Regulatory Commision by President Clinton, and was the first woman and first African-American to hold the position. In 1999 she became the 18th president of Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, and was, again, the first woman and first African-American to hold the position. Since then, Dr. Jackson has become one of the highest paid professors in the United States and serves on the board of directors for over a dozen companies including IBM, FedEx, and the New York Stock Exchange.
  8.  Ada Lovelace
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    Ada Lovelace was a mathematician and computer scientist in the 19th century. She is widely considered the creator of the first computer program. Lovelace created an algorithm to be run on an “Analytical Engine” which would compute Bernoulli numbers.
  9. Mary Jackson
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    In 1958, Mary Jackson became NASA’s first African-American female engineer. After graduating college with a dual degree in math and physical science, Jackson began her career as a teacher at a black school in Maryland (public schools were still segregated at the time). Her first job at NASA was as a mathematician, and after 34 years she had achieved the most senior engineer position at NASA. Throughout her life she tutored high school and college students, and was an advocate for women and other minorities.
  10. Hypatia
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    Hypatia, also known as Hypatia of Alexandria, was a Greek mathematician, astronomer, and philosopher in 300-400 CE. She collaborated with her father and fellow mathematician, Theon of Alexandria. No written work of hers has survived to modern times, however, it is documented that she was head of the Neoplatonist School in Alexandria sometime around 400, where she taught philosophy.

I barely hit the tip of the iceberg with this post. These women contributed so much to the scientific community, as did many, many women like them. I could write ten articles about amazing women in science, but I chose these ten women for their groundbreaking contributions to science and/or for being the first woman to contribute to their field.

Did you enjoy this post? Share your thoughts in the comments below, and share the post via Facebook or Twitter. Want to see more posts like this? Follow me here on WordPress.

 Resources:

http://www.women-inventors.com/

http://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/five-historic-female-mathematicians-you-should-know-100731927/

http://culturess.com/2016/09/13/10-female-scientists-color-know/

http://www.scientistafoundation.com/brain-break/meet-flossie-wong-staal-pioneer-in-hiv-research

https://selfrescuingprincesssociety.blogspot.com/2016/06/barbara-mcclintock.html

http://bermon.es/esl/quotes/tag/women/

http://www.news.com.au/technology/science/first-female-astronaut-valentina-tereshkovas-mars-plan/news-story/b12ee415bc6efb7e39d34f0b7d8a6160#ixzz2XWZKQD1c

http://www.azquotes.com/author/45405-Stephanie_Kwolek

https://twitter.com/thinkincau/status/555261168076349440

http://www.verifyrecruitment.com/blog/index.php/adas-bicentennial-birthday-200-years-ada-lovelace/

https://www.nasa.gov/content/mary-jackson-biography

http://www.azquotes.com/author/7127-Hypatia

http://izquotes.com/quote/229876

6 Tips for Packing Light

A couple of weeks ago, I traveled with my 15-year-old cousin (who lives near me) to New England for a week to see her aunt, my cousin. I’ve traveled a lot, and lately I’ve been getting into backpacker style traveling. On my last trip to Europe I stayed in hostels and didn’t check any luggage. It mostly started because I’m cheap, but it’s become more of a hobby now (and I’m still cheap). I’ll share some tips for packing light so that you can also stop paying to check a bag!

“You don’t have a suitcase?” My younger cousin’s mom asked me when we met in the airport parking garage a couple of hours before our flight.

“Nope” I replied, and gestured towards my backpack. We trekked into the airport, my cousin, her mom, my husband, and I, chatting about school and work and traveling.

Later, inside the airport, when she was paying $25 extra for my cousin’s checked bag her mom turned to me and asked again “You aren’t checking anything?”

I shook my head and my husband chimed in “Once you’ve lost a bag, you’ll never go back” I’ve actually never had an airline lose my luggage, but I’m super cheap. Paying $25 on top of my $300 ticket AND risk them losing my belongings? No thanks.

We arrived in NY and when my older cousin came to pick us up, the first thing she said to me was “that’s it?” upon seeing my backpack. “I’ll tell you how, just keep an eye on my blog” I joked.

Tip #1: Ask yourself, “Do I really need this?” Despite impressing my cousins, my husband still accused me of taking too many toiletries. “Do you need all of this?” He asked as he watched me pack. It’s a good question to ask yourself. If you don’t normally need something, it’s probably best to leave it at home unless you know for a fact you will need it on your trip. I’ll admit, in a normal week I don’t need workout clothes (oops) but my cousin is pretty active, so I knew visiting her meant we’d hit the gym at least once. Just be adaptable and pack for your trip and yourself.

Tip #2: Wear your bulkiest clothes to the airport so you don’t have to pack them. Even if it’s going to be warmer and you end up carrying your coat/jacket, it’s a great way to save space in your luggage. Carrying a coat or jacket doesn’t count as a carry-on or personal item. You can also put stuff in the pockets if you’re really desperate, but I would recommend saving this for the return trip, since you’ll likely have souvenirs of some kind. Just be careful not to put anything “suspicious” looking in your pockets.

To the airport I wore:

A short sleeved top
A pair of leggings
A pair of boots
A warm jacket

Tip #3: Plan to wash and/or re-wear your clothes. I haven’t checked luggage in 3 years. You can pack everything you need in carry-on size luggage no matter how long your trip is. I’ve found that I need a certain amount of stuff, no matter how long I’m going away. You always need pants, shirts, etc, but the trick is to re-wear and/or wash your clothes. If you’ll be away for more than a week you’ll probably need to wash clothes, but if you were at home, wouldn’t you be doing laundry anyway?

Tip #4: Save and use small containers for traveling with small items. I’ve saved mint tins and plastic razor boxes for a while and they’re awesome for organizing bobby pins, jewelry, cotton swabs, and other small accessories.

Tip #5: Utilize packing cubes. Organizing your belongings into packing cubes is a great way to save space. It seems counterintuitive to add items to save space, but cubes (or honestly, any small zip-up cloth bags you have) help you to smoosh items down. Bonus: they also help you to organize into outfits or type of clothing.

Tip #6: What you should pack.

What I packed in a backpack for a one week trip:

2 dresses
2 pairs of jeans
1 pair of leggings
2 cardigan sweaters
2 pairs of PJ pants
2 comfy T’s for sleeping
2 tank tops
3 short sleeve shirts
1 long sleeve shirt
1 pair of tennis shoes
1 set of workout clothes (shirt, shorts, sports bra)
Socks and underwear for a week
A laptop
A magazine
An (empty) water bottle
I also packed travel sized toiletries. You’d be surprised what you can find in under 3 oz bottles. I have everything from deodorant to hairspray to baby powder to body spray.

Places to find small bottles of liquids:

Target/Walmart
5 Below
Bath and Body Works
Big Lots

If you can’t find your favorite shampoo or lotion in small bottles, you can purchase empty airplane sized bottles pretty much anywhere (Target, Walmart, Big Lots, REI, Dick’s, etc.) just check the travel section. You can then fill them at home with your favorite product. But lemme warn you, it’s messy and not the easiest task to accomplish. I would recommend just purchasing products that are already in travel sized bottles, but I’m not your dad.

If you follow this guide, you too can stop paying to check a bag when you travel!

Did you like this post? Share via Facebook or Twitter. Subscribe to my blog and keep an eye out for more packing tips. Do you have any packing tips? Share them in the comments below!

10 Gifts Under $20 Your Mom Will LOVE For Mother’s Day This Year

Mother’s Day is on May 14th this year, so it’s time to start thinking about what to do for your mom, or the special women in your life. Whether you’re totally broke or have a little cash, crafty or can’t sew on a button, see your mom every day or live halfway around the world, here are 10 ideas for you to show your mom you care.

    1. Season 1 of her favorite old show on DVD (For example, my mom loved the Mary Tyler Moore Show. It’s not on Netflix, and I know she’d like to re-watch it. It’s $9.99 on Amazon)
    2. A personalized etched wine glass. The etching cream comes with instructions, but get creative! Use stencils to add your mom’s initials, “mom” or a design. $7 for cream on Amazon + dollar store glasses set of 4 $4 + stencils $5 for basics on Amazon = $16. If your mom isn’t a wine drinker, try shot glasses, a flower vase, or any sturdy glass.
    3. Recreate a photograph from your childhood. Ask another family member to help you dig through old family photos. Find a picture of you or you and your siblings. Get the sibs together and recreate it! Try to match the setting, your clothes, every element you can. Make a copy of the original and get a print of the recreation. Dollar store frames + photo printing <$5
    4. Customized DIY tile photo coasters.   This is one for my crafty readers!  Find the instructions here.  You’ll need 4×4 tiles, 4×4 photos, Mod Podge, a foam brush, felt, ribbon, clear spray sealant, and a hot glue gun.  If you aren’t crafty this project might run you more than $20.  However, if you already have the craft supplies on hand, all you’ll need to purchase are the tiles and photo prints.
    5. A handmade craft from Etsy. There are some beautiful handmade earrings and necklaces for less than $20.  Often they’re made-to-order and customizable!
    6. Engraved jewelry. Find a simple piece of jewelry and customize it with an engraving. You can engrave your mom’s initials, your parents’ anniversary, or something special to you and your mom. $10.17 for engraver + $9 for jewelry from Target or Walmart.
    7. Something you can do together. This can be something free like a picnic or inexpensive like a matinee movie, local winery tour or theater production. Pick something you and your mom will both enjoy.
    8. A $20 bottle of wine or spirits she wouldn’t buy herself. My mom loves wine.  However, she usually sticks to $10 or less grocery store bottles.  A $20 bottle of wine is something I know she would enjoy, but isn’t something she’d normally spend that much on.
    9. A book and its movie adaptation. You can find a list of movies based on books by BuzzFeed here. I personally enjoyed both the book and movie adaptation of The Help. You can find the DVD for $7.99 and the book for $9.59 on Amazon.
    10. A mini body wash, lotion, and body spray set in her favorite Bath and Body Works scent. These minis are awesome for traveling, and the lotion and body spray are perfect to throw in your purse. (3 for $12.50)

Please note that I made this post with my own mother, grandmother, and aunts in mind.  I hope that this will help you to have ideas for inexpensive, but still personal gifts for the important women in your life this Mother’s Day.

Disclaimer: if you follow the Amazon links in the body of this post and make purchases through them, I will receive a small compensation from Amazon.  This compensation comes from Amazon, not from you, and the price you see through my links is the same as the price you would see otherwise.  However I have no association with Etsy, Bath & Body Works, Buzzfeed, or any other sites linked above.  In an attempt to bring you the best content, I linked to the sites that I felt were the most relevant, compensation notwithstanding.

Did you like this post?  What are your Mother’s Day gift ideas?  Comment your ideas below, share this post on Facebook, and follow my blog for more content like this!

Vegetarian Mexican Pizza

I’m not a fan of a drawn-out explanation before getting to the recipe. So, without further adieu….

Vegetarian Mexican Pizza

Recipe makes one 10-12” pizza

Ingredients:

1 Pizza Crust (I used Boboli thin crust, which is pre-made, pre-baked pizza crust)
1 can black beans
½ tsp cumin
¼ tsp paprika
¼ tsp cayenne
1 bell pepper (any color)
1 small tomato
1 jalapeño (you can add more or less to taste)
1 handful of corn
Mexican cheese blend
Salt
Parsley

Directions:

  1. Place pizza stone in oven and preheat to 500°F
  2. While oven is warming up, cook one can of black beans
  3. Seed and dice tomato, jalapeño(s), and bell pepper
  4. Once beans are cooked, mash them and combine with cumin, paprika, and cayenne. Make sure the consistency is spreadable, you may need to add some water (I used the water I cooked the beans in).
  5. Remove stone from oven and place crust on stone
  6. Working quickly, spread bean mixture on crust (this is your pizza sauce), add cheese to taste, veggies (tomato, jalapeño, bell pepper, and corn), and parsley to taste. Sprinkle with salt to bring flavors together. You will probably have more vegetables than you need. The leftovers make a nice salsa!
  7. Place pizza in oven for 2-5 minutes. Keep a close eye on it and remove when the cheese begins to melt.
  8. Enjoy!

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My husband and I have made this pizza together a few times. It’s a modification of this recipe. We had a lot of fun making it, and it was delicious.  In the picture above you can see I used a red bell pepper.  I’ve also made this pizza with a mix of red and orange peppers, and it worked well.  Any mix of bell peppers should be sufficient.

You might enjoy making your own crust, in which case you should bake your crust, then follow the directions with the pre-baked crust. We used a store-bought, pre made, pre-baked crust because I’m not about that bread baking life.

It’s a delicious, different pizza that is 100% vegetarian, though thoroughly enjoyed by my meat-eating family. It still packs protein because the sauce is black bean based!

Did you enjoy this recipe? Did you make any modifications? Tell me about it in the comments below! Share with friends via Facebook and follow my blog for more recipes like this.

Travel Mistakes I Made (So You Don’t Have to)

So you just booked your first International flight and you’re thinking “what now?” Or maybe you’re a veteran traveler who is looking to save some money and travel backpacker style. Below are 5 mistakes I’ve made, and tips for traveling on a budget.

  1. Paying for a hotel
    • Hostels are not scary. If you’ve lived in a dorm, you can handle a hostel. The  biggest downside is sharing your space. The biggest upside is sharing your space! You’ll meet other travelers who are potential new friends.
    • Airbnb is your friend. You can rent anything from a whole apartment to a couch. You’ll have an opportunity to stay in areas you probably couldn’t afford a hotel in, and chances are it’s nicer. The hosts usually put more effort into making you feel at home than a hotel would. I’ve stayed in whole apartments and private rooms in someone else’s home. I’ll admit, staying with a stranger sounds pretty sketchy, but it’s not as weird as it sounds.
    • Couchsurfing. It’s not a service I’ve tried yet, but I know other people have and have had success with it. If you’re nervous about staying with strangers, you aren’t alone but the site verifies both surfers and those sharing their couch. The best part? It’s FREE. You aren’t allowed to offer or accept payment.
  2. Paying $1000s for a flight to Europe
    • I flew to Poland in 2014 and I booked a flight through regular* means. It cost me $1200 round trip and included a 12 hour overnight layover. In October of 2015 I flew to Denmark. I booked through Wow air and paid about $600 round trip (yeah, that’s HALF price). I booked both flights about the same distance out (6-8 weeks). One downside to Wow is that they aren’t in many airports in the US yet (I flew out of DC), but they’re all over Europe. Also, flights within Europe are super cheap ($99-200) so getting across the ocean is the most expensive part.
    • Another airline offering cheap transatlantic flights is Norwegian Airlines.  With Norwegian** you can fly from JFK to Oslo for about $400 (booking 5 weeks out). (Look for future posts specifically about flights!)
  3. Checking a bag
    • Checking a bag usually costs extra. You do not need that much stuff. I traveled with someone on study abroad who brought framed photographs for a 4 week trip. Don’t take stuff you don’t need. I haven’t checked a bag in years and I don’t miss it. (Keep an eye on my blog for a full post with packing hacks!)
  4. Not having appropriate converters/surge protectors
    • When I went to the UK in 2006 (pre-smart phones) I didn’t have appropriate converter/surge protectors. This meant my hair dryer just didn’t work! Make sure you look into everything you’ll need for your specific destination.
  5. Buying an international phone plan
    • Find free WiFi and use Skype, WhatsApp, or Facebook messenger. You aren’t traveling abroad to spend all your time talking to folks back home.
    • If you really NEED a phone for some reason, buy a cheap burner phone when you arrive.

There are so many things you can do to make your travel experiences cheaper and more efficient.  If you liked these tips, keep an eye on my blog for more in-depth posts regarding flights, packing, and more.

Have any good travel hacks of your own?  Share them in the comments below.  If you liked this post, share it on Facebook and follow my blog for more content like this.

*I flew JetBlue, then Lot airlines on my trip to Poland.  I had good experiences with both airlines, however, there are cheaper flights out there!

**I have flown Norwegian within Europe, but have not traveled from the US to Europe on a Norwegian flight.