Destination: Oslo, Norway

Oslo: A quick look

Language: Norwegian, English spoken fluently by most people

Currency: Norwegian Krone

Drinking Age: Norway has a minimum purchase age of 18 for anything less than 22% ABV, and a minimum purchase age of 20 for anything 22% or higher

Public Transportation: Oslo has an intricate metro, tram, and bus system that makes moving around the city very easy

Passport: Yes, but US citizens can stay in Norway up to 90 days without requiring a visa.

Vaccines: Routine

Oslo_Waterfront1

This post may contain affiliate links.

Before you leave:

Situated at the end of Oslofjorden in southeastern Norway, Oslo is the political and financial capital of the country. Founded as a city in 1040, it has gone through many different revisions and changes throughout history. In modern times, Oslo is a multicultural city that possesses a large sphere of influence throughout Europe and the world.

Similar to the rest of Scandinavia, Norway feels quite expensive to most people. Even when compared to Sweden and Denmark, Norway takes the spot as most expensive. The Economist Intelligence Unit ranks Oslo as fourth in the world for cost of living. That doesn’t mean you can’t get by on a budget! Check out our Stockholm post for tips on how to do it cheaply, as many of the same rules and tricks will apply.

We spent a total of about 4 days in Oslo, which was a good amount of time. For onward travel, the train system is very efficient and makes numerous trips to the other major cities. Although we were there in the fall, we actually think summer or winter would be the best time to go. In summer, the weather will be warmer and walking around outside will be nice and pleasant. In the wintertime, skiing and other winter activities become the main draw. Despite Oslo being a major metropolitan area, skiing and other outdoor activities are easily accessed just outside the city. Many ski resorts even have beginner classes if you don’t know how to ski, so here’s your chance to learn!

At The Globetrotting Scientist, we always recommend learning at least a few words in the local language, even if you can get by entirely in English (like you can in Norway). If nothing else, it shows an observance of the fact you’re a guest in someone else’s country, and you’re attempting to learn more about the culture and language. When Norwegians hear that you’re not a fluent speaker, they’re likely to switch to English, but it’s definitely worth trying! Norwegian is a pitch-accent language, so you really need to hear it to imitate it properly. Norwegian is also considered one of the easiest languages for English speakers (even easier than Spanish) to learn, so here’s your chance!

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Once You Get There:

Where to stay: Airbnb is rapidly gaining popularity in Oslo, but we stayed at Citybox. Citybox is a budget hotel right in the city center. By cutting away all of the excess associated with hotels, it feels like a cross between a hotel and a hostel. It’s definitely worth checking out if you prefer hotels, but don’t want to spend a fortune.

As with our Stockholm post, we recommend trying to limit how much you go out for food and drinks. In a place like Oslo, this can be hard because there’s so many good options! Kiwi is a good, budget grocery store to get most everyday food items. Vinmonopolet is the state run liquor stores in Norway, and you’ll have to go there to get anything stronger than 4.75% ABV. Both Kiwi and Vinmonopolet are easy to find throughout the city.

  1. Oslo Opera House

    Oslo_Opera_House

    The Oslo Opera House is an architectural work of art. The building itself is beautiful and you can walk onto the slanted roof, from which you’ll see the stunning views of the city and the waterfront. Of course, you can also go inside and enjoy operas and plays, but unfortunately when we visited we did not have the time or funds to do so.

  2. Karl Johans Gate

    oslo-Karljohangate

    Karl Johans Gate (Karl Johan’s Street) is the main pedestrian street in Oslo. It stretches from Oslo Central Station (Sentralstasjon) at one end, and runs to the Royal Palace (Slottet) on the other. There are many events that happen on or near Karl Johans Gate. It’s definitely worth an evening stroll, especially in the summertime, or shopping any time of year. If you’re there in May, try to catch the May 17th (Norwegian National Day) celebration on Karl Johans Gate.

  3. Oslo city hall

    Oslo_CityHall2

    Oslo city hall is not just another government building. It’s essentially a museum that’s open to the public, where you can view government conference rooms, artifacts, and historical setups. You can even take tours. When we visited city hall, we got there not too long before closing, but I enjoyed it so much I went back on my own during our short trip.

  4. National theater

    Oslo_NationalTheater

    While we didn’t go inside, the outside of the building is cool. Located in central Oslo, it’s in a cool area too with lots of easy access to greenery. If you’re interested in seeing the inside, there are multiple tours done in both English and Norwegian. To see some Norwegian dramatic arts, there is also shows done fairly often. For a current list of shows and events, check out Oslo’s tourism site. 

  5. Walk around the water

    Oslo_Waterfront2

    When I first visit a new city, one of my favorite things to do is to spend a little time walking around. Norway in general, and Oslo specifically is one of the most beautiful places I’ve ever visited. Walking along the waterfront or up and down the pedestrian streets is highly enjoyable. Aker Brygge, near central Oslo, is a good place to walk around and see the waterfront restaurants and coffee shops.

  6. Day trip to Lillehammer

    Lillehammer

    The 1994 winter olympics were held in Lillehammer, Norway. Luckily, it’s a short train ride from Oslo. If you visit in the winter, you can ski the slopes like an Olympian. We visited in the fall, so we were just able to walk around and take some photos. We spent a whole day in Lillehammer, which would be great if the weather was appropriate for skiing, but if you visit when there isn’t snow on the ground, I’d recommend a half-day trip, as there isn’t much else to do in Lillehammer. If you’re familiar with your Norwegian Netflix TV shows, you’ll see plenty of places from the show Lilyhammer!

  7. Akershus Fortress

    Oslo_Fortress

    Akershus Fortress is a fun part of Norwegian history. Originally built in the 1200’s, it has held numerous roles throughout history, including serving as the royal residence and as a prison. In modern times, it functions as a military base, but tourists are allowed to freely walk around much of the fortress during the day. This is also the location of Norwegian Armed Forces Museum, as well as a small museum commemorating the Norwegian resistance movement during World War II.

Oslo is a hidden gem in the European travel scene. It’s definitely worth a visit on your next trip around Northern Europe. From beautiful natural scenery to high culture in the Opera House, Oslo has something for you. If you liked this post, check out some of our other Destination guides for our favorite out-of-the-way backpacker destinations like Stockholm, Sweden, Pristina, Kosovo, Rishikesh, India, and San Ignacio, Belize.

About the authors:

David Anthony is a recent graduate of NC Central University’s School of Business. He is an avid traveler and an enthusiast of all things Scandinavia. He speaks Swedish and Norwegian and was co-organizer of a local Scandinavian meetup. He also enjoys hiking, backpacking, and rock climbing.

Allegra Anthony is who you know as the Globetrotting Scientist. She is a scientist at a small pharmaceutical company in NC. She has visited every Nordic country except Finland and is an avid traveler. She prides herself on being able to predict the outcome of sitcoms. She also enjoys reading, writing, and (very) amature photography.

A special thanks to pixabay.com and Allegra Anthony for providing the excellent photography in this post!

 

Destination: Stockholm, Sweden

Stockholm: A quick look

Language: Swedish, English spoken fluently by most people

Currency: Swedish Krona

Drinking Age: 18 to purchase alcohol in a bar or restaurant and to purchase low strength beer at a grocery store. 20 to purchase wine and liquor at the government run “systembolaget.” Many bars and clubs will set a higher limit, usually 20 or 23.

Public Transportation: Stockholm has an excellent system of buses, metro stations, and even ferries that are used to travel around the city. If you plan to use public transportation often, purchase an unlimited access pass at T-centralen (central station). Here’s the website for Stockholm’s public transportation system (in English).

Passport: Yes, but US citizens can stay in Sweden up to 90 days without requiring a visa.

Vaccines: Routine

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This post may contain affiliate links.

Before you leave:

Being the capital of Sweden, Stockholm is the political and economic center of the country. Roughly two million people live in the metropolitan area, spread across the 14 island archipelago on the edge of the Baltic sea. The area known as Stockholm has been inhabited since the Stone Age, and it was founded as a city in the 1200’s. As such, there is plenty of history and culture in Stockholm.

Stockholm, and all of Sweden, can seem quite expensive when compared to much of Europe. To cut cost, try and stay in an AirBnb and buy your food at ICA (a grocery store similar to Aldi). I had a studio apartment for $37 a night, and purchased sandwich ingredients at the ICA down the street from me. Not exactly fancy, but it’ll do the job.

Go in the summertime. Seriously, don’t be me and go in mid January. If you don’t like cold wind, snow, and rare daylight, just plan to go in the middle of summer. Swedes love to be outside, so there’s a lot more going on in the summertime.

At The Globetrotting Scientist, we always recommend learning at least a few words in the local language, even if you can get by entirely in English (like you can in Sweden). If nothing else, it shows an observance of the fact you’re a guest in someone else’s country, and you’re attempting to learn more about the culture and language. When Swedes hear that you’re not a fluent speaker, they’re likely to switch to English, but it’s definitely worth trying! Swedish is a pitch-accent language, so you really need to hear it to imitate it properly.

KIMG0014-edit

Once You Get There:

I can’t stress this enough, but if you’re trying to limit your spending, the easiest thing to do is to avoid restaurants and bars. I would recommend buying alcohol duty free before you enter the country (I bought a liter of vodka for around 10 euros in Munich) and shopping for food. Stockholm has a varied nightlife though, so I’ll give some recommendations below on where to go to meet people and make friends.

In contrast to above, bars are an easy way to meet Swedes. Swedes tend to open up a little easier when there’s alcohol involved. In fact, there’s a bit of a joke in Sweden that if a stranger smiles at you, they’re either American, insane, or drunk. Here’s your chance to make Swedish friends!

  1. Kungliga Slottet and Drottningholm Palacedrottningholm-palace-2419776_960_720

The Royal Palace is just plain cool. As the name implies, this is the royal palace of the Swedish monarchy. Inside the palace, there are several museums including the “museum of antiquities” and the Tre Kroner Museum. Like any proper palace, another common attraction is seeing the Royal Guards. Although pictures and such are fine, they are an actual military force, so follow any posted signs or instructions.

Like many European palaces and castles, there are rumors that Drottningholm Palace (the one where the royal family actually lives) is haunted. Several rumors and legends tell the story of various spirits, including a “gray man” and a “white woman.” Don’t worry though, Queen Silvia says the ghosts are friendly. 

2. Vasa Museum

vasa-museum-1260536_960_720.jpg

Being a city near the water, it makes sense that Stockholm would have an entire museum dedicated to a 17th century warship. In 1628, the Vasa sank on its maiden voyage, but that didn’t stop them from beautifully restoring this ship. It’s 130 SEK (about $15USD) to get in, and children under 18 get in for free. Tours are offered in both English and Swedish. It’s a fun place if you want to nerd out about Scandinavian nautical history.

3. Kungsträdgården

Kungsträdgården

This attraction definitely falls into the category of things that are better done in the summer. It’s a beautiful park that’s great for an afternoon stroll after walking around downtown Stockholm. In the wintertime there’s an ice skating rink, which I didn’t partake in (despite how hilarious that would’ve been for everyone involved). In the summertime, there are many concerts and events. Summertime is also when the trees come into bloom, and the warm weather and vibrant colors are a welcome end to the cold and gray winter.

4. Nightlife

StockholmNight

And where would a European capital be without a decent nightlife? Stockholm has a wide variety of clubs and bars, but I’ll list off a few unique places that are worth checking out just for their cool factor. Nightlife in Stockholm is broken up into two main areas: Stureplan, and Södermalm. Stureplan is right near the financial center, and subsequently is incredibly expensive. If you’re looking to splurge, hit up Stureplan. On the other hand, Södermalm is the trendier hipster neighborhood where things aren’t quite as bougie.

The Ice Bar is a cool place to visit. Conveniently located near T-centralen, Drinks are served in shot glasses made of ice, and there’s often an interior design theme that gives the place a unique feel and look. The interior is kept below freezing, because most of it is made of ice, so bring a jacket when you go! Kids are also welcome, as the bar serves non-alcoholic mocktails as well. Ice Bar definitely falls into the more expensive category, due to its unique atmosphere and tourist presence.

Aifur is ridiculous. Located in Gamla Stan, It’s a viking themed bar and restaurant that steers into every viking cliche and stereotype imaginable. There are horned helmets and wooden tables and viking decor. The menu includes mead and reindeer hearts. Airfur will be a bit expensive compared to other non tourist-y places, so keep that in mind if you’re on a budget. It feels goofy, but it’s fun in a tourist-y way. It’s definitely worth stopping in for some mead.

On the cheaper end of the spectrum, two bars come to mind. Restaurang Mosaik, located in Södermalm, has an “afterwork” special from 1-6PM where beers are 29 SEK (around $3USD). They also have seats that overlook the water, making this a nice evening place to grab drinks.

Bar 08 is also a solid contender, being far enough away from the touristy places to have a good mix of locals. Beers can be had at Bar 08 for as little as 25 SEK.

This is just a tiny list of all the options in Stockholm. As you can see, nightlife in Stockholm can go from unbelievably expensive to on par with what you’d pay in the US. Shop around, do your research, and you shouldn’t have a problem grabbing drinks on occasion. Many people will pregame before hitting the bars to save money, so this is where buying alcohol in a store cheaply will help.

5. Gamla Stan

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Gamla Stan, meaning Old City, is a fun place if you want to see old architecture. It has the cobblestone streets, narrow alleyways, and old buildings that are always fun for a casual walk. Gamla stan also has the Nobel Museum, which has a lot of artifacts and information about the Nobel Prize, and Alfred Nobel. A fun activity in Gamla Stan is to try and find Mårten Trotzigs Gränd, the narrowest alley in Stockholm which is only 90 centimeters wide at its narrowest point.

6. Stockholm Pass

museum-history-stockholm

Pro tip if you like museums: Stockholm offers a Stockholm pass that gets you into many different attractions, museums, and tours. It can be a bit pricey, but if you’re into doing a lot of museums and tours when you travel, it can save you quite a bit of money. There’s even some suggested itineraries on their website.

There are so many things to do in Stockholm, I could just keep listing things indefinitely. Hopefully this post will help you get an idea of some of the more popular things to do in the city, and help you plan out a fun trip while minimizing cost. The Stockholm tourism website has a ton of info for planning a trip. If you want any more info on Stockholm or travelling in Sweden, ask us in the comments!  If you liked this post, check out some of our other Destination guides for our favorite out-of-the-way backpacker destinations like Oslo, NorwayPristina, Kosovo, Rishikesh, India, and San Ignacio, Belize.

About the author:
David Anthony is a recent graduate of NC Central University’s School of Business. He is an avid traveler and an enthusiast of all things Scandinavia. He speaks Swedish and Norwegian and was co-organizer of a local Scandinavian meetup. He also enjoys hiking, backpacking, and rock climbing.

A special thanks to pixabay.com and David Anthony for providing the excellent photography in this post!

Big News!

This fall, my family will be moving to the Czech Republic!

 

It has been a dream of mine for half my life (since I was 12, literally half my life) to move to Europe. If you want to read more about how that dream began, check out How I Fell In Love With Traveling. I am incredibly excited! I’m also extremely proud of my husband, because he will be an English Teaching Assistant through the Fulbright scholarship, the most prestigious international relations grant in the world. While we’re there, I will be continuing to blog, furthering my education, and of course, traveling!

MapofEurope

Over this summer, however, we’ll be trying to pare down our belongs, learning Czech, and preparing to move abroad. I will continue to work hard to bring you great content, but I wanted to warn you that there may be a brief break in my regular posting. Hopefully, I will be able to bring in some guest writers and blog in my down time, but we’ll have to see how life goes.

BonVoyageBitmoji

I can’t wait to share my experiences in Europe with you! I look forward to blogging about our adventures for the next year and hope that you’ll enjoy sharing them with me. I hope that friends and family will come visit us when we’re there.

Ahoj!

Have you ever lived abroad? Where did you live? What were your experiences like? Tell me about it in the comments below! Share this post via Facebook or Twitter and, as always, follow me here on WordPress for more GREAT content like this!

Photo of the Week: Poznań, Poland 2014

Four years ago, in May 2014, I rekindled my passion for traveling.  That’s not to say the passion ever truly went away, but finances and school, and blah blah blah, life in general just got in the way.  Between my first international trip in the summer of 2006 and my study abroad trip in May-June of 2014 I traveled within the US.  I became more comfortable on a plane, I saw more big cities but I did not have the opportunity to experience a different culture.  The idea of studying abroad in 2014 was scary, but I am eternally glad that I did it.  I needed to step outside my comfort zone and really start working towards the things I was passionate about.  Na zdrowie!

A Backpacker’s Guide to Packing: Winter Edition

So you just booked a trip to Europe. The plane lands on European soil in January. Hard, frozen, European soil. How do you pack? Do you have to lug around an extra suitcase for all your scarves, boots, and coats? NOPE. Just follow my tips and you can travel with only a backpack in any weather.

  • Wear your bulkiest clothes to the airport

    Warmchunkyclothes.png

    Your chunky boots, thick scarf, and big coat should be on your body, even if it’s a little warm when you’re traveling. It will save you a ton of space in your bag. Don’t try to pack 5 pairs of shoes either–throw in some shower shoes and be okay with the shoes on your feet.

  • A down jacket is more packable than a fleece one

    Coat

    For an all around insulation layer, I prefer a packable down jacket. It’s lighter and more packable than the standard fleece jacket everyone seems to take with them. The one I have weighs less than two pounds and packs up smaller than a football. Sure, there’s some fleece jackets out there that meet that criteria, but this jacket was less than $30 on Amazon. It’s a good all around insulating layer that I use traveling, hiking, climbing, etc.

  • Pack layers

    Layering

    When I traveled to Scandinavia in October a couple of years ago, I wore a coat and scarf over a sweater over a shirt to the airport. Layer up so that you are prepared for any weather instead of packing separate outfits for potential temperature fluctuations.

  • Stick to a color scheme

    ColorScheme.png

    This is a good general packing rule, but is especially important with winter clothing. Make sure you match your clothes to your coat and scarf and don’t pack anything that doesn’t fit in the theme. This means you’ll have many different outfit combinations to choose from.

Pretty simple, huh? For more general packing tips, check out this post, 6 tips for packing light and this one, Essential items every traveler needs before the next big trip. Good luck!

Did you enjoy this post? What are your packing hacks? Tell me about them in the comments below! Share via Facebook or Twitter and f ollow me here on WordPress for more GREAT content like this!

Links:

Bulky clothes photo: https://goo.gl/images/qDZ5D8

Down jacket photo: https://goo.gl/images/yXZpsh

Layers photo: https://goo.gl/images/4oYvs6

 

Destination: Pristina, Kosovo

Pristina: A Quick Look

Language: Albanian; Serbian spoken by a minority
Currency: Euro
Drinking Age: no minimum legal drinking age
Public Transportation: Buses and taxis are common in the city, and between cities
Passport: Required for US citizens. US Citizens may stay in Kosovo up to 90 days without a visa
Vaccines: Routine vaccines, plus Hepatitis A. Hepatitis B and Rabies recommended for some travelers

Before you leave:

  • Pristina is the capital city of Kosovo, a small somewhat disputed nation in Southeastern Europe. It would be wise to do some research regarding the Yugoslavian civil war, which is still in very recent memory for many Kosovars
  • Avoid discussing Serbia if possible. Serbia’s control of the region for many years is not a pleasant memory, and no matter what your opinion of the conflict is, it’s best kept to yourself.
  • Kosovars are very warm and friendly. You will find that many are genuinely eager to be your friend. It’s not uncommon to be invited into someone’s home shortly after meeting them.

Once you get there:

    • The easiest way into Pristina is to fly into the international airport, or to rent a car and driving up from either FYROM (Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia) or Albania. Keep in mind that in the past, people have had trouble crossing the border between Kosovo and Serbia due to the border not really being formally recognized by Serbia. It’s possible to drive across, but research the immigration practices before attempting or you could end up with fines and unneeded hassle.
    • Public transportation can be a little hard to figure out in Kosovo. The easiest way to figure it out is to ask a local! You might have to try a few people before you find someone that speaks English, but they will point you in the right direction. Pristina is also rather walk-able, if you so choose.

1. Bill Clinton Boulevard

This is always my go-to fun fact about Pristina: there’s a 10 foot tall statue of Bill Clinton along “Bill Clinton Boulevard.” It was built in 2009 to commemorate Bill Clinton’s support of Kosovo during the Yugoslavian civil war. I remember being caught totally off guard when I was driving through Pristina and happened across a giant Bill Clinton statue next to the road. Good times…

2. Newborn Monument

The Newborn Monument is a must see. Unveiled on 17 February 2008, the day that Kosovo declared independence from Serbia, it symbolizes Kosovo’s status as a new nation. The coolest part about it: It’s repainted every year, with the new design being unveiled on February 17th.

3. Skanderbeg Square

Skanderbeg Square marks the beginning of the pedestrian streets in Pristina. It’s also the site of a statue commemorating Skanderbeg, an Albanian hero. There are plenty of nice hotels in this area, and when the weather is good you can see lots of people out and enjoying themselves.

4. Kosovo Museum

The Kosovo Museum is full of artifacts found throughout the country. Its mission is to preserve the history and culture of the country. It is also the headquarters of the Kosovo Archaeological Institute. They’ve carefully preserved thousands of artifacts, some dating all the way back to the Ottoman Empire. It’s a good way to spend half a day if you’re into museums and history.

5. Natural Beauty

Travelling in Kosovo is not complete without also taking in the natural beauty. If you’re used to travelling in North America or Western Europe, Pristina might feel a little run down. If the city is getting to you, there’s tons of things to do in the surrounding countryside, oftentimes these things are also not in any guidebooks. All of the following are not more than a few hours by car from Pristina.

  • Summit Mt. Ljuboten
    At 8196 feet, Mt Ljuboten is the tallest mountain in Kosovo. Climbing the mountain takes most of a day unless you’re really fast, and in the summer it is nothing more than a steep walk and a casual scramble. In the winter, however, you’ll need proper climbing gear as it’s covered in snow and ice. The summit sits right on the border between Kosovo and FYROM. On a clear day, you can see incredibly far from the top. It’s a good place for a #kosovo photo op.
  • Mirusha Park
    Pictured above, exploring Mirusha Park is a great summertime activity. It’s a large canyon with all sorts of waterfalls and lakes to swim in. It’s a great place to cool off in the summer and meet other people. Don’t miss this one.
  • Brezovica Ski Resort
    Called “the most delightfully dysfunctional ski resort in Europe” by the New York Times, Brezovica is a fun place to learn to ski. If you’ve ever been to a ski resort in the United States, you might want to forget about that experience, as Brezovica Ski Resort is nothing like that. The lifts are rickety, the rental skis are well loved, and the kids will literally ski circles around you and laugh when you fall backwards on flat ground. If you don’t know how to ski, my recommendation is to just rent a pair, go up the slope right outside the hotel, and start riding down. You’ll figure it out!

In summary, Pristina (and Kosovo in general) is a good place to start if you’re looking to get off the beaten path in Europe. It’s safe, the people are nice, and the countryside is beautiful. Espressos and wine are fun, but there’s a whole other side to the continent most Americans never take the time to get to know. Kosovo is incredibly unique, you won’t find anywhere quite like it. After having lived there for 9 months, it sorta grew on me in a weird way. If you’re looking to break out of the old Paris-Berlin-Budapest route, hop on over to Pristina for a few days.

Many thanks to David Anthony for creating this guide to Pristina, Kosovo.

Did you like this article? Have you visited Kosovo? Tell us about it in the comments! Share via Facebook or Twitter, and as always, follow me here on WordPress for more GREAT content like this!

Links:

Bill Clinton Boulevard: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bill_Clinton_Boulevard#/media/File:Bill_Clinton_statue.jpg

Newborn: http://pages.kiva.org/node/10892

Skanderbeg Square: https://www.tripadvisor.com/LocationPhotoDirectLink-g295385-d2476250-i131836377-Swiss_Diamond_Hotel_Prishtina-Pristina.html

Kosovo Museum: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kosovo_Museum#/media/File:Muzeu_i_Kosov%C3%ABs.JPG

Mirusha Park: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mirusha_Park#/media/File:Unseen_Mirusha.jpg

NYT Article about Brezovica: https://www.nytimes.com/2016/02/28/travel/kosovo-ski-holidays.html?mcubz=3

Pristina photo: https://sk.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pri%C5%A1tina

Travel Mistakes I Made (So You Don’t Have to)

So you just booked your first International flight and you’re thinking “what now?” Or maybe you’re a veteran traveler who is looking to save some money and travel backpacker style. Below are 5 mistakes I’ve made, and tips for traveling on a budget.

  1. Paying for a hotelHotelroom
    • Hostels are not scary. If you’ve lived in a dorm, you can handle a hostel. The  biggest downside is sharing your space. The biggest upside is sharing your space! You’ll meet other travelers who are potential new friends.
    • Airbnb is your friend. You can rent anything from a whole apartment to a couch. You’ll have an opportunity to stay in areas you probably couldn’t afford a hotel in, and chances are it’s nicer. The hosts usually put more effort into making you feel at home than a hotel would. I’ve stayed in whole apartments and private rooms in someone else’s home. I’ll admit, staying with a stranger sounds pretty sketchy, but it’s not as weird as it sounds.  (If you sign up using my link you’ll get a $40 credit and I could receive a small compensation as well.)
    • Couchsurfing. It’s not a service I’ve tried yet, but I know other people have and have had success with it. If you’re nervous about staying with strangers, you aren’t alone but the site verifies both surfers and those sharing their couch. The best part? It’s FREE. You aren’t allowed to offer or accept payment.
  2. Paying $1000s for a flight to EuropeSadonAirplane
    • I flew to Poland in 2014 and I booked a flight through regular* means. It cost me $1200 round trip and included a 12 hour overnight layover. In October of 2015 I flew to Denmark. I booked through Wow air and paid about $600 round trip (yeah, that’s HALF price). I booked both flights about the same distance out (6-8 weeks). One downside to Wow is that they aren’t in many airports in the US yet (I flew out of DC), but they’re all over Europe. Also, flights within Europe are super cheap ($99-200) so getting across the ocean is the most expensive part.
    • Another airline offering cheap transatlantic flights is Norwegian Airlines.  With Norwegian** you can fly from JFK to Oslo for about $400 (booking 5 weeks out). (Look for future posts specifically about flights!)
  3. Checking a bagTooManyBags
    • Checking a bag usually costs extra. You do not need that much stuff. I traveled with someone on study abroad who brought framed photographs for a 4 week trip. Don’t take stuff you don’t need. I haven’t checked a bag in years and I don’t miss it. (Keep an eye on my blog for a full post with packing hacks!)
  4. Not having appropriate converters/surge protectorsPlugandfeet
    • When I went to the UK in 2006 (pre-smart phones) I didn’t have appropriate converter/surge protectors. This meant my hair dryer just didn’t work! Make sure you look into everything you’ll need for your specific destination.
  5. Buying an international phone planDudeonphone
    • Find free WiFi and use Skype, WhatsApp, or Facebook messenger. You aren’t traveling abroad to spend all your time talking to folks back home.
    • If you really NEED a phone for some reason, buy a cheap burner phone when you arrive.

There are so many things you can do to make your travel experiences cheaper and more efficient.  If you liked these tips, check out more in-depth posts about packing light, packing for winter, travel essentials, and more.

Have any good travel hacks of your own?  Share them in the comments below.  If you liked this post, share it on Facebook, Twitter, or Pinterest and follow my blog here on WordPress for more GREAT content like this.

*I flew JetBlue, then Lot airlines on my trip to Poland.  I had good experiences with both airlines, however, there are cheaper flights out there!

**I have flown Norwegian within Europe, but have not traveled from the US to Europe on a Norwegian flight.